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Holy Cross Federation

Wormegay C of E Primary

Learning Together for Life

Class 2 - River Nar - 20th March 2018

As part of our work in geography on rivers, key stage two from both schools went to the meadow in Castle Acre, where the River Nar flows on it’s way to join the Great Ouse in King’s Lynn.

The children enjoyed a brisk walk down the hill from the priory car park and across the foot bridge into the meadow.

After all the snow in recent weeks, it was still very muddy and the occasional wellie became separated from its owner!

The river was almost in full flood after all the melting snow, which meant that we were able to observe the effects of erosion quite easily and for those of you who remember your geography, we found recent evidence of the early stages of the flow cutting a new channel through the bank to cut off the meander and create an ox bow lake.

We used orange peel to time the speed of the water flow at different places along the river as well as comparing the flow on inside and outside bends.

Measuring the depth was tricky, but we improvised with string tied to stones to throw into the middle.

It was an excellent opportunity for the children to see first-hand what they had been learning in the classroom and it provided a great experience to draw on for writing and for science work too.

The visit was wrapped up with a quick visit to the ford to wash off our wellies and then the return trip to the priory. Much to the amusement of the staff, the children discovered that the hill they had enjoyed so much on the way down, was slightly more challenging on the way back!

Mrs J Davison

As part of our work in geography on rivers, key stage two from both schools went to the meadow in Castle Acre, where the River Nar flows on it’s way to join the Great Ouse in King’s Lynn.

The children enjoyed a brisk walk down the hill from the priory car park and across the foot bridge into the meadow.

After all the snow in recent weeks, it was still very muddy and the occasional wellie became separated from its owner!

The river was almost in full flood after all the melting snow, which meant that we were able to observe the effects of erosion quite easily and for those of you who remember your geography, we found recent evidence of the early stages of the flow cutting a new channel through the bank to cut off the meander and create an ox bow lake.

We used orange peel to time the speed of the water flow at different places along the river as well as comparing the flow on inside and outside bends.

Measuring the depth was tricky, but we improvised with string tied to stones to throw into the middle.

It was an excellent opportunity for the children to see first-hand what they had been learning in the classroom and it provided a great experience to draw on for writing and for science work too.

The visit was wrapped up with a quick visit to the ford to wash off our wellies and then the return trip to the priory. Much to the amusement of the staff, the children discovered that the hill they had enjoyed so much on the way down, was slightly more challenging on the way back!

Mrs J Davison